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Mar
30
Thu
Visiting Artist: Noel Anderson – Lecture @ A+A Room 109
Mar 30 @ 7:30 pm

Visiting Artist
Noel Anderson
New York, New York
Website
Anderson’s campus visit is sponsored by the UT Print Club and the UTK Printmaking Program.

Artist’s Lecture:
Thursday March 30, 2017, 7:30pm, AA109

Workshop:
Representation in the Break: Meditations on Fred Moten and Radical Aesthetics
Friday March 31, 2-4pm, Friesen Black Cultural Center, Room 103/104

Fred Moten’s book, In the Break, speaks of the potentialities of a radical black aesthetic tradition. Schematizing a totalizing vision of black aesthetics, Moten places musical and literary giants in conversation with each other, in a structure which defines black aesthetics by way of improvisation and resistance. In the Break affords the reader an opportunity to simultaneously become acquainted with such philosophical giants as Heidegger and Derrida, while considering Ellington and Coltrane. This workshop will specifically read In the Break’s introduction, “Resistance of the Object: Aunt Hester’s Scream.” Through this workshop participants will close-read Moten’s text and consider their practice within multiple traditions of aesthetic resistance. People dedicated to critical discourse are encouraged to attend. This workshop is limited to 20 people. To sign-up, contact Johanna Winters: jwinter9@vols.utk.edu
CLICK HERE for the workshop reading as a PDF.

Printmaking Project:
From March 27-31 Noel Anderson will work on a project in the print studios in the School of Art.

Biography:
Noel Anderson is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Printmaking at New York University. He received a Master of Fine Arts degree in Printmaking from Indiana University and a Master of Fine Arts Degree in Sculpture from Yale University. Anderson’s art responds to the absurd masquerading of heroism and leadership.  Through a mixed-media practice that includes costumes, prints, drawings, tapestries, and sculptures – his work attacks the myth of the heroic male leader.  As a myth, this “Moses-like” figure discretely becomes the antithesis to his original purpose; stripping, bending, and bucking the very collective who placed him into an exalted position. Anderson has shown at Jack Tilton Gallery (New York); Studio Museum Harlem (New York); Know More Games Gallery (Brooklyn); Zach Feuer Gallery (New York), and Art Basel Miami 2010. Noel W. Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1981.

Image: “drehen,” Jacquard Tapestry, 49 x 41 inches, 2016

Mar
31
Fri
Visiting Artist: Noel Anderson – Workshop @ Friesen Black Cultural Center, Room 103-104
Mar 31 @ 2:00 pm

Visiting Artist
Noel Anderson
New York, New York
Website
Anderson’s campus visit is sponsored by the UT Print Club and the UTK Printmaking Program.

Artist’s Lecture:
Thursday March 30, 2017, 7:30pm, AA109

Workshop:
Representation in the Break: Meditations on Fred Moten and Radical Aesthetics
Friday March 31, 2-4pm, Friesen Black Cultural Center, Room 103/104

Fred Moten’s book, In the Break, speaks of the potentialities of a radical black aesthetic tradition. Schematizing a totalizing vision of black aesthetics, Moten places musical and literary giants in conversation with each other, in a structure which defines black aesthetics by way of improvisation and resistance. In the Break affords the reader an opportunity to simultaneously become acquainted with such philosophical giants as Heidegger and Derrida, while considering Ellington and Coltrane. This workshop will specifically read In the Break’s introduction, “Resistance of the Object: Aunt Hester’s Scream.” Through this workshop participants will close-read Moten’s text and consider their practice within multiple traditions of aesthetic resistance. People dedicated to critical discourse are encouraged to attend. This workshop is limited to 20 people. To sign-up, contact Johanna Winters: jwinter9@vols.utk.edu
CLICK HERE for the workshop reading as a PDF.

Printmaking Project:
From March 27-31 Noel Anderson will work on a project in the print studios in the School of Art.

Biography:
Noel Anderson is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Printmaking at New York University. He received a Master of Fine Arts degree in Printmaking from Indiana University and a Master of Fine Arts Degree in Sculpture from Yale University. Anderson’s art responds to the absurd masquerading of heroism and leadership.  Through a mixed-media practice that includes costumes, prints, drawings, tapestries, and sculptures – his work attacks the myth of the heroic male leader.  As a myth, this “Moses-like” figure discretely becomes the antithesis to his original purpose; stripping, bending, and bucking the very collective who placed him into an exalted position. Anderson has shown at Jack Tilton Gallery (New York); Studio Museum Harlem (New York); Know More Games Gallery (Brooklyn); Zach Feuer Gallery (New York), and Art Basel Miami 2010. Noel W. Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1981.

Image: “drehen,” Jacquard Tapestry, 49 x 41 inches, 2016

Apr
6
Thu
Artist Lecture: Alison Saar @ A+A Room 109
Apr 6 @ 7:30 pm

saar

Thursday, April 6, 2017
A+A 109, 7:30 PM

Alison Saar weaves narratives relating to the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 into the mixed-media sculpture and paintings featured in “Breach.”
Saar explores issues of gender, race, racism, and the African diaspora. She mines mythology, ritual, history, music, and her biracial heritage as sources for her work.

During a 2013 residency at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, Saar was dismayed to see how little had been done to rebuild African American communities devastated by Hurricane Katrina eight years earlier. Upon her return to Los Angeles, she began researching the histories of American floods and the effect on African Americans. The Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927, described as one of the worst natural river disasters in U.S. history, piqued her interest. Heavy rains resulted in the river breaching levees, creating a historic catastrophe that had a profound impact on the life of African Americans living in the Mississippi Delta. The flood exposed the conditions of poor African American sharecroppers and tenant farmers and their relationship with cotton plantation owners. The flood also resulted in social, cultural, federal policy, and political changes.

With water imagery woven throughout, “Breach” is the culmination of Saar’s creative research on American rivers and their historical relationship to the lives of African Americans. Through mixed media sculpture, paintings, and works on paper, she explores floods not only as natural phenomena; but also the complex interaction of social, cultural, and political factors associated with flooding and its aftermath.

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